Parents & Advocates

Going to college has always been a BIG commitment. A commitment of time, effort, energy and money. Whether you’re a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, godparent, guardian, or an invested friend, you want your child or favorite student to make the most of his or her academic experience.

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Many students and their loved ones have bought into the promise that higher education is THE answer to help them successfully transition into their career or work of choice.

The reality is often less than ideal. Some students are graduating with a degree they’re not very excited about. Some students complete a degree without the promise of a job in their field of study. Many students complete their four-year undergraduate in six years or more.  And, according to Student Loan Hero, “the average Class of 2016 graduate has $37,172 in student loan debt, up six percent from last year.”


In its most recent survey of college pricing, the College Board reports that a “moderate” college budget for an in-state public college for the 2016–2017 academic year averaged $24,610. A moderate budget at a private college averaged $49,320. But what goes into these costs?*


Many students and their loved ones have bought into the promise that higher education is THE answer to help them successfully transition into their career or work of choice.

The reality is often less than ideal. Some students are graduating with a degree they’re not very excited about. Some students complete a degree without the promise of a job in their field of study. Many students complete their four-year undergraduate in six years or more.  And, according to Student Loan Hero, “the average Class of 2016 graduate has $37,172 in student loan debt, up six percent from last year.”

College, in general, has become BIG business, which is great for colleges, not so much for students. This often results in a road to and through college filled with gaps and hidden potholes, as students receive little to no real opportunities for deep self-discovery and affirming career exploration.

The Gallup-Purdue Index Study Year 3, 2016 addresses these gaps and potholes, suggesting that many students are not finding their career services office very helpful. It also demonstrated the importance of supportive relationships through mentorship during the undergraduate experience , which for many students is lacking.


According to the 2016 Gallup-Purdue Index Study, ONLY 17% of 2010 to 2016 graduates report that their career services office was very helpful.**


Students are schooled, counseled and at times frightened into believing that a successful transition into the world of work is primarily determined by external factors – social, cultural, political and economic, which minimizes or excludes factors that make up the individual – biological, psychological and spiritual.

My inside out approach addresses key areas where students tend to get stuck.

We live in a time of unprecedented possibility and opportunity, which demands a different and more intimate conversation about work, transition and choice. Many students are no longer satisfied with a job or even a career, they have their sights set on work they really care about that aligns with the best of who they are, what they value most and what they want to contribute in the world.

Because my focus is helping students take advantage of as many of these opportunities as possible, our partnership can benefit them in a variety of ways:

  • we’ll create a solid financial plan that includes mining for scholarship opportunities to offset the big costs of attending their college of choice
  • we’ll uncover who they are, what lights them up, what they really want to contribute, and where they want to land
  • we’ll get real about the self-defeating behaviors that have kept them stuck so they can release and replace them with more positive and productive behaviors that help them reach their goals
  • we’ll identify gaps in their academic skill set and create a plan to improve them
  • we’ll work around the antiquated approaches to entering the workforce and adopt more creative approaches that take into consideration their vision for the future and the ever-changing work landscape
  • we’ll create a tailored plan and identify immediate next steps to secure work that allows them to contribute in meaningful ways
  • and more . . .

Review my list of student services specially designed to help your child play the college game smarter. 


Have you taken my short quiz to find out if you and your child are as ready for college as you could be?